Mrs Mason (left) and Freda Proudley

Beckingham History Group Open Day - 6th October 2007

The main purpose of the day was to launch the recently published book "Photographic Memories of Beckingham cum Saundby" which is a collection of old photographs of Beckingham and Saundby. There were several displays set up along the theme of past Businesses and Industry and the doors were open to the public from 11am.

Mrs Margaret Mason was asked to officially open the day and was presented with a signed copy of the book from all the members of the Group in thanks for the contribution of material that her late husband, Peter Mason, had collected over several years and donated to the group.


Watson´s Shipbuilders had on display several old photographs of ships being launched from the boatyard and there were also old photographs of the distinctive buildings that had been built to accommodate the offices, workers and of course The Institute that was built as a recreation building. There was also a reproduction of a wonderful painting by Wilfred Hawdon of the last consignment of timber to be delivered just before the shipyard closed. Various old woodworking tools were kindly loaned for the day from Bob Gill.

Albert Phillipson set up the computer to show an on running slideshow and DVDs of the Shipyard, including Watson´s boat catalogue, Church Festival, Arts and Crafts at the Church, a day with D J Davis Basket Making (September) and a slideshow of old Beckingham photographs.
Watson's Shipyard display
Willow Works display
The Old Willow Works display showed old photographs dating back to the time when the building was surrounded by floodwater in 1947 and photographs of the various tools used in the Willow Working process. There were also real life samples of work done and a book on display by Rodney Cousins giving a detailed description of Willow growing and basket making with a page devoted to the Beckingham Willow Works.
Basketwork samples from Lincolnshire Life Museum

On loan for the day from Lincolnshire Life Museum was a collection of miniature basketwork that had been created at the Old Willow Works and is now part of the Museum´s collection after been donated several years ago by Emily Watson (daughter of Herbert Gale ­ a Willow Worker and mother of Barbara Newman)
Agriculture has long been a part of the industry of Beckingham and Saundby and there were various old farming implements on display (complete with straw bales) along with old photographs of farming of yesteryear using the old horse and plough and cattle being driven along the road. Fred Tomlinson (still a working farm today) brought along his vintage Marshall tractor for display outside the Recreation Room which attracted quite a crowd.

There were two Blacksmiths that used to exist in the village. Arthur Holmes ran a Blacksmiths on Bar Road North and there was a copy of a page from his day book dated April 1918. Another Blacksmiths, G Twidale, worked on Wood Lane and there was a copy of one of his bills for work done. Tools included an Anvil among others.
Farming display

Beckingham Windmill used to stand on Gringley Road and this was owned by a Mr Jabez Wilkinson. There were some old photographs of Mr Wilkinson and his Windmill.
In addition to the displays on past businesses and industry the website reproduced their web pages on The Cheese Factory that used to employ over a hundred workers at Saundby with copies also of some of the pages on The Old Willow Works and also the page on the recent Basket Making day in September.

Visitors during the day included the grand­daughter of Herbert Gale (Barbara Newham) who worked at the Willow Works and she brought in some items of interest for the History Group to look at. Sheila Kemp (nee Gill) also brought in a book that her father kept of the minutes from the Cricket Club dating back to 1932. Click on any of the photographs below for a larger image.

www.beckingham-northnotts.org.uk
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